MENTORING

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MENTORING

Don’t read books…
“…consuming words leads to a ‘weakening of the eyes, heat rashes, gout, arthritis, hemorroids, asthma, apoplexy, pulmonary disease, indigestion, blocking of the bowels, nervous disorder, migraines, epilepsy, hypochondria and melancholy’ “
1795 – German writer Johann George Heinzmann counselled
&
Don’t Innovate
“…let us guard against the insidious encroachments of innovation, that evil and beguiling spirit which is now stalking to and fro through the earth seeking whom he may destroy”
1803 – Sermon of US preacher Jeremia Morse advised

BE VERY WARY OF ANY MENTORS LIVING IN ANOTHER TIME… 🙂
WHAT IS MENTORING?
Mentoring is most often defined as a professional relationship in which an experienced person (the mentor) assists another (the mentoree) in developing specific skills and knowledge that will enhance the less-experienced person’s professional and personal growth.

WHAT DOES A MENTOR DO?
The following are among the mentor’s functions:

  • Teaches the mentoree about a specific issue
  • Coaches the mentoree on a particular skill
  • Facilitates the mentoree’s growth by sharing resources and networks
  • Challenges the mentoree to move beyond his or her comfort zone
  • Creates a safe learning environment for taking risks
  • Focuses on the mentoree’s total development

ARE MENTORING AND COACHING THE SAME?

  • No. People often confuse mentoring and coaching. Though related, they are not the same. A mentor may coach, but a coach is not a mentor. Mentoring is “relational,” while coaching is “functional.” There are other significant differences.

Coaching characteristics:

  • Managers coach all of their staff as a required part of the job
  • Coaching takes place within the confines of a formal manager-employee relationship
  • Focuses on developing individuals within their current jobs
  • Interest is functional, arising out of the need to ensure that individuals can perform the tasks required to the best of their abilities
  • Relationship tends to be initiated and driven by an individual’s manager
  • Relationship is finite – ends as an individual transfers to another job

Mentoring characteristics:

  • Takes place outside of a line manager-employee relationship, at the mutual consent of a mentor and the person being mentored
  • Is career-focused or focuses on professional development that may be outside a mentoree’s area of work
  • Relationship is personal – a mentor provides both professional and personal support
  • Relationship may be initiated by a mentor or created through a match initiated by the organization
  • Relationship crosses job boundaries
  • Relationship may last for a specific period of time (nine months to a year) in a formal program, at which point the pair may continue in an informal mentoring relationship

 

The Institute will shortly provide links to acknowledged Mentors for sales management

 

MORE COMING SOON